However for many people who are always prepared everyday carry is about having everything you might need in an emergency or for general use on you at all times. This will often include a light source (torch), a pocket knife, some small tools & rope it’s quite amazing how easy it is to carry all these things with you in your pockets, on your keys or in a small bag.
Love all of the info you have available here! I wanted to clear something up, I am kinda confused!! I just launched my website with Bluehost. When you mention having WordPress. org in order to use adsense, do you mean that you have to purchase a wordpress.org theme? (as in graphics and format)
Hi Derek wow those are some great tips! Thanks for adding that value. I completely agree that every site/blog is different and should be handled appropriately based on user base and readership. It can take time to figure out how to monetize especially when you first start out. I would imagine as readership and page views increase over the years, your blog income should to which is great as long as you do it properly.
If you’re blogging in another language, I would recommend just focus on posting amazing content and then asking influencers to share it for you. You have much less competition, so it should be fairly effective.
Hey! I really want to thank you for providing these tips for someone who is just starting out. Sometime its difficult to know where to start. With your post, it has given me a clear focus and motivation. Thanks so much Jamie
But eventually you are going to get out of your depth either on that project on a project down the road, at which point who are you going to call? Are you going to call somebody randomly that you discovered on Google or are you going to call the guys who you just watched their logo in the corner of a 14-minute instructional video?
And so, I guess my question here would simply be–would a person who follows your blog about TV shows be interested in paying for a TV-related webinar you created? Would a person who follows your blog about vinyl record collecting want to buy an online course from you? Would a person who follows a travel blog you created want to call you up for coaching lessons?
Several years ago I realized bloggers were making money. In some cases, they were making good money! And many of them seemed like regular people, just like me. How exactly were they doing it? And could I make money blogging too?
For instance, we have a guest blogging course that retails for $497. In exchange, we promise to help students get featured on a big blog or magazine like The Huffington Post or Forbes. I think it’s fair to say that exposure is worth $5,000 to the right person. So, the product sells easily and well.
This article has gotten my mind churning and working in so many new and exciting ways. Thank you for sharing your insights! You deserve all the success you’ve been having on your blog. I can’t wait to start putting these tips into REAL practice (not the “wow-I-feel-so-inspired-for-20-minutes-and-do-nothing kind of practice I so often fall victim to).
Lets say, for example, that you refurbish and resell used smartphones out of your home. You could use a blog to attract visitors to your website where you list your current phones for sale. Your blog might cover topics about DIY refurbishing. On one level, it seems counterintuitive because you want people to buy your phones, but it also helps you build a brand and gain recognition. Social media guru Jay Baer explains the concept on Copyblogger:
I just wanted to say that your income reports helped me a lot over the years. They provided a lot of motivation and they also helped me understand what tools might be useful to me as a blogger (the expenses part). It would be great if you continue sharing what tools and resources you use to power your blog, even without the numbers! Thanks so much and continued blessings to you and your family.
But because I’m not launching my blog or writing any blog posts until I hit 10,000 subscribers, I can’t point them to a blog I own that contains some of my writing samples, so that whoever I’m contacting can read and get an idea of my writing style.
Solid numbers about blogging incomes are hard to come by. For example, in the US, the Bureau of Labor Statistics lump bloggers in the very broad category of “Writers and Authors” which has a median income of $61,240 per year. It’s not an accurate measure since there are vastly different occupations included in that category. Information from small surveys and anecdotal evidence can also be found online, but much of it is outdated or taken from tiny sample sizes.
WordPress.org software is free, but you’ll need to buy a domain name (about $14.99/year) and hosting (usually starting from $7.99/month). However, WPBeginner users can get started for only $2.75 per month with Bluehost, an official WordPress recommended hosting provider. They are offering our users 60% off on hosting and a FREE domain name.
This is the best aggregator list I have seen so far! I started blogging recently and have just hit $273.95 in net income. I know it is nothing compared to the blogging greats, but could you kindly add me to the list as well?
If you’re thinking about learning how to start a travel blog then one of the first questions you probably have is “How much money can I make from travel blogging?” Your second question will probably be “Is there still room for new blogs to earn money, or is the market too saturated?” And lastly you’re probably thinking “How do I start a travel blog from scratch?”
It’s my responsibility. If people are ever going to respect blogging as a legitimate business model, those of us who are successful have to speak up and share what we’ve learned. None of us works in a vacuum. The only way we can advance our field as a whole is to collectively share what we’ve learned.
Something that hasn’t been thought of yet: The key to being a successful blogger is to be creative. There are a ton of bloggers coming up with new income streams every day. Step out of the box and try something new.
In the case of my blog, about 99% of my early readers would come, read a single article, and then leave forever. So instead of missing out on a potential regular, I started gathering email addresses using a service called Awebber, but these days I prefer GetResponse.
I learned this lesson the hard way after having most of my income coming from one source in the early days but after a bit of a bad experience began to diversify my income streams (read about that here) – it was one of the best things I ever did!
Excellent breakdown of the real deal man. Thanks for dispelling many of the get-rich-quick crap circulating about how to use blogging as a revenue stream. At MFJLabs we use blogging to augment our SEO efforts for client sites. Works nicely.
With paid methods, you have the opportunity to pay for traffic and clicks right away. And if you do well in targeting your audience on the right channels you can easily build your audience with advertising to supplement your organic efforts.
As an affiliate marketer, you promote someone else’s product or service to your readers. You link to that product or service using your unique affiliate link. When, someone clicks through that link and makes a purchase (or completes a desired action set by the company), you earn a commission. There are thousands of affiliate programs to join. Some I participate in:
Jon, it’s so disheartening to read this list. Not for my sake, but for the sake of all the hobby bloggers I know who keep asking me why their blogs aren’t getting the traffic, attention, or sales they were hoping for, and how in the world can I be building my email list before I even start blogging? Am I STUPID or something?!
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really great article, thanks Jon. I particularly like #1 – it’s the mindset shift that we all need to step up and “play” at the level to generate substantial revenue. Reversing the sales funnel is also very smart and makes a lot of sense. It’s easier to make one $3,000 sale than making 300 $10 sale – although putting a $10 product out there is less scary than selling a $3000 service – again, it’s all about the mindset.
Indirect Income – later on in my blogging journey opportunity has come for ‘indirect’ income streams. As my blogs and profile grew as a result of my blogging I was able to sell my services as a speaker and consultant and was offered the opportunity to author a book with the publisher Wiley. Later I was able to start an event for bloggers which also made money. None of this income came directly from the blog – but rather it came ‘because’ of my blog.
I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around this one. I was blown away that you don’t have ads on your site. I have ads on my site and I’m reading along thinking your advice is to forget the ads and sell products. As a food blogger, my mind goes to e-cookbooks, actual hold-in-your-hand cookbooks, books on how to start a food blog and how to do food photography. But according to this post, those I should sell later…the cheaper products. I can’t think of what “services” I could offer, other than offering to come over and cook for them (not happening) and I’m not quite an expert at offering services of personally coaching someone’s food blog. Maybe I’m just too green for that 🙂 Am I missing the point?